Approach

3R-method

We have developed the 3R method to tackle the plastic waste problem in water. This method tackles the problem in three steps: Research, Remove and Reuse.

By thoroughly understanding the problem in the Research step, we provide you with an idea of ​​the location in the area where you can remove plastic from the water in the most sustainable and affordable way. With the insight from the first step, we can then use the most suitable solution in the Remove step to remove the plastic. To ensure that the plastic waste problem in water can be definitively stopped, we provide insight into the plastic that has been removed in the Reuse step. We can help you to set up preventive measures and policies from local to European scale.

Nothing speaks more than images.

Play Video

In order to solve a problem, you must first understand the problem. In the Research step we help you to gain more insight into where the plastic comes from and where it goes. We provide insight into the sources, the transport and the locations where the plastic accumulates.

Using various methods and techniques, we can provide insight into the potential hotspot locations, the degree of pollution in your area and the flux of plastic at crucial points in your water area.

Resources, transport and hotspots
Geographical analysis
The Noria GIS method looks at three steps: possible sources of plastic waste, routes that the plastic is expected to follow, and locations where there is a good chance that the plastic will remain there (plastic hotspots). The sources and possible accumulation sites are identified using the GIS analysis. It is then made clear how the plastic can be transported from source to hotspot. The water system analysis is used for this. By combining these two analyses, a more complete picture is possible of: where plastic can come from, when and how it is transported and where the plastic may accumulate. We validate these potential hotspots in the field. This gives us a first picture of the quantities and type of plastic that are present at these hotspots at these locations.
Resources, transport and hotspots
Floating plastic
Plastic monitoring
To determine in which locations the most effect can be achieved with measures to remove the plastic from the water, it is important to know two things. In which watercourse is the plastic influx (flux) highest? How is this floating plastic distributed over the width of the waterway (from quay to quay) By placing cameras in strategically suitable locations, artificial intelligence models can continuously measure plastic flux and distribution. The model we developed further recognizes floating plastic objects in the water and links a unique ID to each of these objects, which are then counted. With these insights you can offer a much more targeted and affordable solution to the plastic that floats in your waterways.
Floating plastic
Floating plastic
Plastic monitoring
The percentage of plastic floating in the water column is very interesting to map. This has a major influence on the understanding of the relationship between the plastic that floats, floats or is already on the bottom. By gaining insight into the quantities and distribution of this suspended plastic in the water column, more informed decisions can be made for targeted and affordable solutions to remove the plastic in your waterway. We use sonar to map the plastic in the water column down to the bottom. The plastic that does not float but floats in the water column is currently more difficult to measure. Nets are currently mainly used for this purpose. It is often not possible to deploy nets over the full depth and width of the waterway. Measuring plastics in the water column with sonar therefore has a number of advantages compared to network measurements. Sonar can be used under varying river conditions, does not hinder shipping and can measure right down to the bottom.
Floating plastic
Microplastics
Plastic monitoring
The downside of plastic floating for a long time in the water is that it can degrade into microplastic due to chemical, biological and mechanical processes. Microplastic can harm marine animals' health when digested and ends up in our daily food. The quantity of microplastic (<5mm) present in our waterways is still unknown and critical to estimate. Using our multifunctional SurfSampler and the micro-plastic measuring nets, we collect water samples from our waterways. By driving the SurfSampler in a straight line, water samples are collected without influencing the microplastic occurring from any disturbance to get an accurate result. These samples from multiple runs are then stored in a separate jar removing excess water. The microplastics are manually filtered from organic waste and quantified to estimate the amount of particle present per square kilometer.
Microplastics